Courtesy of Vanderbilt/Susan Urmy

Courtesy of Vanderbilt/Susan Urmy

I'm an assistant professor of political science at Vanderbilt University, since August 2016. Prior to that, I had the pleasure of serving in the Political Science department at the University of Pittsburgh between Fall 2013 and Summer 2016. My research interests include American political institutions, executive branch policymaking, separation of powers politics, and formal and quantitative methods. My research has appeared in political science journals including the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, and Presidential Studies Quarterly

Specifically, much of my work focuses on how both Congress and the courts influence the president's use of various unilateral powers including executive orders, signing statements, rulemaking, and regulatory review. I also explore how many of these constraints influence the longevity of executive policies.  Further, I am working to apply existing federal SOP theories, as well as develop new ones, to state-level policymaking by examining gubernatorial executive orders. Other projects explore the causes and consequences of changes to legislative capacity, statutory discretion, as well as motivations in campaign contributions.

I earned my PhD in Politics from Princeton University in July 2013. Before that, I graduated from The Ohio State University in 2008 with a BA in Political Science and Economics. As a native of Ohio and proud OSU alumna, I am a faithful fan of the Ohio State Buckeyes - especially football. How firm thy friendship...O-HI-O!